Art Briefs: C4 Atlanta expands; Georgia Women’s Movement Project; Houdini exhibition opens

Nonprofit  arts service organization C4 Atlanta has announced a space expansion to provide more studio opportunities to artists. C4 has signed a lease to become a tenant at 132 Mitchell St., which will create office space for small arts businesses and nonprofits. The space will have two common area rooms for meetings or workshops. C4 Atlanta has a target move-in date of May 1. As part of a program expansion tied to the space, C4 Atlanta will be receiving a $10,000 grant from the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation to pilot a new incubation program that combines professional development and coaching with studio space for artists. For more information, email actionteam@c4atlanta.org.

The Georgia Women’s Movement Project Spring Event is set for Tuesday, April 23, 5-7 p.m. at the Special Collections & Archives a Georgia State University Library, 100 Decatur St., in Downtown. The event is held annually to highlight collections in the Georgia State University Library Women’s Collections, and to celebrate the lives of the unsung heroines of the women’s movement in Georgia. The 2019 event, The Milk of Woman Kindness, will highlight the work of women who help and serve other women and families. Sandra Barnhill (Foreverfamily), Awaz Jabari (Refugee Women’s Network), Mary Kane (Altrusa), and Deborah Richardson (International Human Trafficking Institute) will provide insights and wisdom. To register for the event or RSVP, email mgerrard@gsu.edu or call (404) 413-2888. Find out more at blog.library.gsu.edu.


The William Breman Jewish Heritage Museum opens Inescapable: The Life and Legacy of Harry Houdini, an original exhibition exploring the life and legacy of the world’s most famous magician, on April 14. Featuring artifacts, photos and archival records, many on loan from public and private collections,Inescapable showcases the incredible story of how this Hungarian Jewish immigrant, Ehrich Weiss, transformed himself into an international superstar.. “It gives visitors a deeper understanding of how the Houdini story fits into the saga of Jewish immigration in the late 19th century and how the technological innovations of his time enabled his rise to stardom,” says Leslie Gordon, executive director of the Breman Museum. For more information, visit thebreman.org.

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