Van Gogh, Monet and Picasso part of High Museum’s next big exhibition

Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881–1973), Reclining Figure, 1934, oil on canvas. The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C., gift of the Carey Walker Foundation, 1994.

While art lovers are still lining up for the “Yayoi Kusma: Infinity Mirrors” exhibition, the High Museum of Art has announced what is sure to be their next blockbuster: “European Masterworks: The Phillips Collection.”

The exhibition, which will run April 6 through July 14, 2019, will feature work by Eugène Delacroix, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Honoré Daumier, Gustave Courbet, Édouard Manet, Claude Monet, Alfred Sisley, Edgar Degas, Paul Cézanne, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Pierre Bonnard, Georges Braque, Nicolas de Staël, Alberto Giacometti, Wassily Kandinsky, Henri Matisse, Amedeo Modigliani and Pablo Picasso. In all, there will be 75 iconic paintings and sculptures from the collection of Duncan Phillips, who opened his acclaimed museum in Washington, D.C., in 1921.

Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853–1890), The Road Menders, 1889, oil on canvas. The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C., acquired 1949.

The grandson of a prominent Pittsburgh industrialist, Phillips built the extraordinary collection over the course of his life to share it with an international audience. Many of the works in the exhibition have not traveled together in more than 20 years.

“The Phillips Collection is one of the most satisfying focused art collections I know. It is a veritable who’s who of late 19th and early 20th-century modernism, but it is also intensely personal,” said Claudia Einecke, the High’s Frances B. Bunzl Family curator of European art. “The collection shows Duncan Phillips’ penchant for strong, expressive color and design — as in the works of van Gogh and Bonnard — as well as his affinity for artists whose independence of spirit he admired, such as Daumier and Klee. This exhibition delivers a one-two punch: the highest artistic excellence and evidence of a collector’s exceptional discernment and personal conviction.”

For more information, visit high.org.

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